Tag Archives: california

Happily Hidden from View

Hidden between the fog of the Pacific Ocean and a vast swath of towering coastal redwood trees lies a magical landscape along the California coastline. A place where the bark of sea lions or bellow of fog horns is only muffled by the crash of waves against the majestic cliffs that jut violently from the crystal blue sea. A place of extraordinary beauty reached after following the twisted byway that winds west from a scorching inland summer through dreamlike vineyards, colossal forests and oak-covered canyons towards the sea.

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Point Arena Lighthouse

While most of the country bakes in the humid blister of a summer heatwave this coastal dreamscape remains immersed in endless spring. Even on sun-filled afternoons of cloudless blue the cooling breezes of the vast sea drift inland to cool the headlands and tiny hamlets that dot the coast. On most days the morning fog holds the town in a cooling embrace just long enough to ensure comfort as the day awakens.
The town was settled by fortune seeking entrepreneurs who, upon witnessing the seemingly endless bounty of over 2 million acres of ancient redwoods that lined the coast, built sawmills and other infrastructure designed to take down as many of them as they could in the shortest amount of time possible. Within 50 years they had accomplished 97 percent of their task. What took 2000 years to develop was gone in, to these trees, a blink of an eye.

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Point Cabrillo Lighthouse

With their task completed the mills began to close. Almost entirely cut off from any access besides the sea, the town languished by the edge of the continent. The Victorian era houses built strong by the mostly New Englanders that worked in the area remained but by the mid-1900’s the population of the area was in significant decline.
Artists eventually were drawn to the rugged beauty of the coast and many set up residences in the 1950’s. The incredibly engineered route of the Pacific Coast Highway gave access to travelers willing to brave the never ending twists and bends to reach the area. Old Victorian mansions became charming inns and many of the houses of the town were transformed to restaurants and shops designed to entertain these visitors. The counterculture kids who flocked to San Francisco in the late ’60’s and ’70’s made their way north to set up communes and find the utopian paradise they envisioned creating.

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Point Cabrillo Lighthouse

While nature’s forces have kept this an isolated land in the past, today’s attentive visitor will soon get the feeling that the remoteness is now by choice. The 800 citizens of this town seem to prize the uniqueness that blossoms with distance from more urban locales. A feeling of hip funkiness is pervasive along the waterfront main street. Colorful characters mix easily with more gentrified visitors who make the winding trip north from the Bay Area for long weekends.
Mendocino’s remoteness should not in any way be confused with detachment from the rest of the world. The rambunctious and rebelliousness of the towns Fourth of July Independence celebrations displayed the citizen’s passionate patriotism while still making clear their non-support of current Washington politics. The parade along Main Street has become rightfully famous and was so hugely attended that the population of the town easily tripled for the day. A massive tent was set up in town for 2 weeks to host an incredible music festival with a full opera as well as orchestra, jazz, folk and pop concerts nightly.

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Mendocino

We found ourselves embraced by the redwoods in a tiny cabin just inland from the main area of town. We spent our mornings and evenings sitting on the deck overlooking a rough garden full of late spring beauty. We had daily visitors to our garden including deer with new babies, foxes, hummingbirds and even a pair of playful skunks. The towering trees often had fog blowing through them in the mornings and evenings.
Our afternoons were spent wandering the streets of the town or sitting in one of the town’s coffee shops watching people pass. We planned car trips to some of the tiny towns that hang precariously a the cliffs of the coastline. The towns of Elk, Albion and Point Arena were afternoon destinations. With populations of less than 200, these enclaves still provide plenty of rewards for slowly paced visits. Nearby secret inlets and tiny beach lined coves provide picturesque picnic spots. Jagged headlands push precariously into the ever pounding waves of the sea. Winding paths through late spring tall grass provide unparalleled views over the often raging waters below. Wildflowers of abundant colors defy the wind and harsh conditions to add color to every nook and cranny they can get into.

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Point Cabrillo Lighthouse

Other days we made our way on tiny roads through thick redwood forests by small streams. A profound quiet exists in these forests that can be found nowhere else. All sound seems to disappear into the thick trunks and the spongy forest floor masks even the sound of one’s own footsteps.
Abundant vineyards lie just inland in beautiful valleys. The wines produced here compare favorably with any from the more famous vineyard areas of California. The small towns of Philo and Boonville provide perfect stops to find local products for picnics or just window shop for an afternoon.

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Mendocino Headlands

We celebrated the completion of our 7th year of continuous travel in an area that is as close to home as we have been in a long time. Our last of 3 stops in our home state has made us realize how much we are missing by being gone for such a long time. While sitting on our porch in the redwoods our thoughts drifted to when we may settle down to a more conventional lifestyle permanently. Seeing relatives that we too seldom visit made us realize that we might soon feel our trip is complete. Seeing this beautiful area located so close to home made us think that we might eventually be content to stay closer to home sometime in our near future.

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Mendocino Sunset
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The Mirage in the Desert

When it comes to feelings about the desert, there really is no indecision. You are either in or out. There is no in-between. Some see it as a wasteland, hot, arid and forbidding. Sand, sky and scrub. Certainly not worth visiting, much less living in. Others see it as everything they have ever dreamed of. A perfectly blank canvas where they can create any story their imagination can render. A vast landscape of endless opportunity whose only limit is one’s own vision. The latter are the people who made Palm Springs.
Utilizing what they had, the first visionaries took advantage of the hot dry air and natural thermal baths. Imagining cures for a host of conditions amongst the cactus, smoke trees and palms they built curative spas designed to give sufferers hope. People came from all over the country to spend time resting and rehabilitating in the shadows of the towering San Jacinto mountains that tower over the surrounding area.

 

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Palm Springs Modern

 
The 1930’s were a time when America’s Wild West was long gone but Hollywood westerns were all the rage. Enterprising Palm Springs entrepreneurs found ways to cater to the desires of city slickers who wanted to experience an era they had missed. They founded ranches where visitors could come and spend time riding horses, working with cattle or just eating hearty food around a roaring campfire. Singing songs by a chuck wagon fulfilled the romantic dreams of these “dudes” who wanted to spend days riding the range and nights camping under the brilliant stars that are still visible today.

Hollywood made many of these western movies in the rugged canyons nearby Palm Springs. The stars took a liking to the laid-back lifestyle and word got around quickly that life in the desert provided an opportunity to let loose without the prying eyes of the Hollywood gossip machine. The Tennis and Racquet Clubs were popular and massive pools provided the perfect landscape for a decadent cocktail culture. Glamour was king as large Spanish Revival mansions began to sprout in the downtown area. The Movie Colony, Las Palmas and Mesa neighborhoods roster of residents began to read like a whos-who of popular celebrities of the time.

 

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Palm Springs Style

 

The celebrities wanted entertainment and enterprising impresarios provided it. Bars, restaurants and nightclubs opened in the downtown area. Ritzy hotels provided luxurious surroundings for those who wanted to reside temporarily. Casinos, technically illegal, opened in the nearby deserts. The mafia made inroads. Bands played, liquor flowed and people danced late into the night to big band sounds. Visitors commonly reported VIP sightings. Frank Sinatra, Cary Grant, Marilyn Monroe, Elvis, Bob Hope and Bing Crosby were just a few of the luminaries frequently seen around the town.

The post World War II era was a time of prosperity and change for Americans. Many found financial opportunities that hadn’t existed in their life previously. They wanted to live the good life. Relax, live a little and enjoy a bit of luxury that hadn’t been available for the masses for a long time. Freeways were built throughout the country that made travel easier. The space race made people dream a little bigger. Palm Springs was advertised as easy to reach luxury for the common man. Hotels were built with massive pools heated by endless sunshine and shaded by towering palms. People arrived in masses. Fashionable stores opened along wide boulevards to cater to their desires. A casual style was popular. Tiki bars, Hawaiian shirts, dark sunglasses and cocktails in the evening with friends.

 

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Palm Springs Sunset

 
Many people who sampled what Palm Springs offered wanted more. They were easily enticed to establish at least a part-time residence. These new jet-setters weren’t interested in old styles. A new style of architecture that matched the era was needed. A modern style of flat roofs, large pools and glass-walled opulence that broke down the barrier between outdoor and indoor living became all the rage. Large tracts of affordable houses with high designs were built by competing architects and builders. Maybe no place in America better displayed what the “future” might be like. Abundant enthusiasm was everywhere.

In the surrounding area vast palm lined golf courses, a dizzying 120 for a population of just 500,000, were built. The neighboring desert communities of Rancho Mirage, Indian Wells, Palm Desert and La Quinta were expanded and developed. Gated communities lined the wide roads named after celebrities. Houses were built along the fairways, designed for affordable luxury and a relaxed country club lifestyle that seemed possible even for common people. A place to celebrate their hard earned success after a life of work. The deserts lack of water seemed distant as 1 pool was built for every 4 people and air conditioning helped combat the afternoon heat. Year-long tans were possible. Long imagined dreams were coming true. A comfortable retirement could be had that was filled with entertainment, activity and companionship.

 

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Palm Springs Tiki

 

Somewhere Palm Springs lost a bit of its way. Boxed between these newer communities and the towering mountains the city began to be seen as a retirement community. Palm Springs didn’t have the room to expand to meet this new market and perhaps it suffered a little. With the jet age, many of the celebrities drifted to further, more cosmopolitan locales. Palm Springs had always sold a dream and perhaps it lost a bit of its imagination. Perhaps it’s Golden Age had passed. It sat, preserved in the desert heat waiting for a new set of dreamers.

But the desert always welcomes people with visions. Artists rediscovered the area. Members of the LGBT community, sometimes disenfranchised elsewhere, found acceptance. Creative people, often outpriced in other areas of expensive California, found that the low prices of the desert offered opportunities. A new generation of Southern California creatives tricked up the existing hotels, revitalizing them with style reminiscent of their storied past. Stylishly hip young people Instagrammed fun-filled weekends to the world. The popularity of mid-century modern architecture and style drove many to rediscover and restore the vast reservoir of stylish houses found in most neighborhoods. Small motor courts were turned in to exciting hidden enclaves favored by young celebrities and the stylish wealthy. Modern hotels and spas were built, all with a style that tipped it’s hat to the past.

 

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Palm Springs

 

This new Palm Springs is what we found on our month long visit to the desert. We caught the end of the season (anytime avoiding the summer heat). We rented a cool mid-century modern styled apartment in the Racquet Club Estates area near the wonderfully revitalized Riviera Hotel. We found stylish shops to visit along the twin boulevards of Indian Canyon and Palm Canyon Drives. We spent scorching afternoons at happy hours in old-school cocktail bars reminiscent of Rat Pack days or re-imagined Tiki Bars that perfectly capture the colorful past. We visited the coolest retro hotels where we found stylish SoCal hipsters enjoying themselves in football field size pools. We toured uniquely styled houses that have been restored so well that they probably exceed their past glories. People were friendly and welcoming and we enjoyed many conversations in the cool cafes in the stylish downtown area.

 

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Palm Springs Hotel

 

Our favorite memory will be the tour of a house for sale next door to Frank Sinatra’s famed Twin Palms estate. Once owned by his lawyer, the layout suggested late-night cocktail parties attended by celebrities partying around the gorgeous pool surrounded by luscious palms. Closing our eyes for just a minute, we felt we could almost hear Dean, Frank and the rest of the Rat Pack cavorting next door late into the night. We saw a lot of things during our month in Palm Springs that they would certainly recognize and definitely would approve of. We felt the original founders would be proud of the current crop of dreamers that seem to be once again imagining Palm Springs future.

 

 

 

Into the Trees

I don’t believe that there is an ancient lava field flowing beneath the ground. I don’t think it causes an electric current that draws people from all over the earth to its center. I don’t think that the electric current has curative powers or even gives people extrasensory powers. I don’t think restorative energy flows upward from the ground and can be felt if you believe in it hard enough. The well-dressed lady in the art gallery does. In fact, she is convinced of it. She told me about it at length after I had complimented her on her ceramic work and had only known her for a few minutes. She described it in detail, with eyes twinkling and voice whispering. I think she was speaking from a place in her heart and was being totally serious. She truly believed…but I didn’t. I wish I did…but I don’t.

 

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Joshua Tree National Park

I do however believe that there are places where magic might sometimes be real. Places where people from different backgrounds and with different ideas come together to share dreams and create energy that can be felt. I usually find these places a little ways off the normal path. In places that are a little uncomfortable or difficult to live in without seeking out the assistance of others. Somewhere beyond the first line of mountains, or in the thick of a forest. Up a long valley just past where the last bridge crosses the river. Maybe in a desert full of strange trees and giant granite boulders that rise up out of the ground in odd ways and with shapes that require you to name them. Places so high and so dry that most people without enough time would write them off as a wasteland. Places with immense beauty that might not be apparent at first glance.

 

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Joshua Tree Sunset

These places are usually populated by people that see things a little differently. Artists, writers and creative types abound. Maybe a few outcasts are mixed in. Hippies, bikers, free thinkers and people that found life in the normal places just wasn’t for them. Maybe people that are looking for a new beginning or at least an opportunity to live with a few less rules. Conformity is generally not necessary but acceptance of others is.

 

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Arch Rock

I think when we eventually decide to stop traveling we would like to settle in one of these places. We have discovered a few of them along our way. After being exposed to so many different cultures, cuisines and ways of life for the last few years, it seems it might be difficult to return to what we used to call normal. Regular life just feels uncomfortable.

 

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Joshua Tree Boulders

We can feel the end of the journey calling. It is still only a light viewed faintly in the distance, but with each passing month, it grows brighter. It feels as though we should begin planning an exit strategy. For the first time in our lives, we will be choosing a place to live based on what our interests are and not just what we are forced into by school, jobs or convenience. It is a more difficult choice than we expected.

 

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Joshua Tree Sunrise

We haven’t retraced our path often over the last 7 years. 3 years ago we spent a month in the high desert of Southern California. We thought it had some of the magic we might be looking for. The Mojave Desert town of Joshua Tree just felt right then and we wanted to see if it could be a permanent stop some day. It might be worth taking a second look.

 

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Joshua Tree Sunset

Joshua Tree is a small town of only 4,000 or so people. An eclectic mix of citizens populates the town. Artists, hippies, retirees, free spirits and ex-military are common. Rock climbers, musicians, bikers, tourists and temporary residents fill out the mix. The town anchors one of 3 entrances to Joshua Tree National Park and, for us, provides the easiest access to the most attractive parts of the park. It has one bar, one coffee shop and a cool vibe that we like.

 

 

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Roy’s Motel and CafĂ©- Amboy, California

We arrived during the two-week arts festival. Resident artists open their homes and studios to visitors and it provides a unique window into that segment of the population. It is an excellent time to make your way around the area meeting artists. The houses are spread out and visiting a couple dozen takes you along many dirt roads and into many areas you might have missed otherwise. The artists are all friendly and seem glad you made the effort to find them.

 

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Along Route 66

We bought a yearly pass to the park and put it to good use. We visited almost daily during our stay. We hiked desert trails, climbed boulders and saw lots of animals. Bighorn sheep, coyotes, rabbits and even a bobcat made appearances during our stay. We found the best time for sightings was during the weekdays around sunset when we mostly had the park to ourselves. After record rainfalls last winter the animals are plentiful and look heavier than we had seen in the past. We even pulled over to watch many tarantulas cross a section of road one evening just after the sun went down.

 

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Cholla Cactus Garden

Of course, sunset and sunrise are the most beautiful times to visit the park. If the skies are filled with the right amount of clouds there is a good chance for incredible sunsets. The vivid colors are amazing, sometimes so bright it appears the entire sky has caught fire. Cloudless days can be just as amazing if you visit the park after dark. The Mojave Desert has some of the darkest skies anywhere in America and on moonless nights the stars can be incredible. We brought snacks and chairs and made our way a short distance into the desert and waited for the light show to begin. The Milky Way was incredibly bright and the stars shined so intensely that I don’t remember ever seeing so many. The desert was so dark and quiet, it seemed we were alone in the world.

 

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Joshua Tree Star Trails

We enjoyed our afternoons relaxing around the town. Whether discussing authors in the local bookstore, having a chat with the librarian or enjoying a perfectly brewed cup of coffee under a shade tree on a patio, most days were spent relaxing in the perfect weather. While the rest of the country has taken a turn toward winter, we enjoyed warm afternoons and pleasantly cool nights for our entire visit.

 

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Barker Dam

We were surprised at how easy it was to make friends with people we met. We enjoyed their stories and they seemed impressed with our travel stories from recent years. We had an opportunity to look at a few houses during our stay. The town has become increasingly popular with people from the Los Angeles area. Good because they have brought with them great style and have made many improvements to some of the local housing. Unfortunately, with the new popularity comes increased prices and less availability of housing.

 

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Route 66 Sunset and Moonrise

I don’t know what the future will bring for us once we decide to settle down more permanently. We may find a home here in the high desert or we may not. If we do, I think we will find an incredibly beautiful place with lots of friendly and interesting people. If we don’t then we at least got a second look at a place that has a little magic and a lot of beauty amongst the boulders and crazy trees that we found during our stay.

 

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Joshua Tree Trails